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Bystander Intervention: USA Gymnastics and Beyond (A)
Freeman, R. Edward; Mead, Jenny; Liedtka, Jeanne M.; Grushka-Cockayne, Yael; Santos, Grace Case E-0482 / Published January 19, 2023 / 5 pages.
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Product Overview

This partially disguised, public-sourced case details the situation surrounding longtime USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar's abuse of athletes from the standpoint of someone who must decide whether and how best to intervene. In 2015, Megan Peterson, an elite gymnastics coach, has accidentally overheard a troubling conversation about Nassar between the athlete she directly supports, Janet Smith, and a teammate. After helping Smith feel safe enough to talk to her about what is going on, Peterson learns that Nassar has been abusing young athletes from his position as a trusted, respected medical professional for the national gymnastics team. Now she has a huge decision to make: Does she have a responsibility to report what Smith told her? If she does, would she be betraying her athlete's confidence and hurting Smith's chances to make the 2016 Olympic team? Moreover, given Nassar's position and good reputation in the USA Gymnastics organization, if Peterson reported what she'd learned, would she be believed?




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  • Overview

    This partially disguised, public-sourced case details the situation surrounding longtime USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar's abuse of athletes from the standpoint of someone who must decide whether and how best to intervene. In 2015, Megan Peterson, an elite gymnastics coach, has accidentally overheard a troubling conversation about Nassar between the athlete she directly supports, Janet Smith, and a teammate. After helping Smith feel safe enough to talk to her about what is going on, Peterson learns that Nassar has been abusing young athletes from his position as a trusted, respected medical professional for the national gymnastics team. Now she has a huge decision to make: Does she have a responsibility to report what Smith told her? If she does, would she be betraying her athlete's confidence and hurting Smith's chances to make the 2016 Olympic team? Moreover, given Nassar's position and good reputation in the USA Gymnastics organization, if Peterson reported what she'd learned, would she be believed?

  • Learning Objectives