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The DPC Concentric Health Relationship Platform: Catalyzing Social Entrepreneurship in Health Care Services
Mulloth, Bala; Ellington, A. Jefferson; Taft, Art Case ENT-0219 / Published November 3, 2017 / 10 pages.
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Product Overview

The existing U.S. health care system is complex. Most individuals have health insurance coverage provided by various third-party payers. The payers include employers, health insurance carriers, and government-sponsored programs, such as nationally administered Medicare and Medicaid, which is offered by all 50 states with some support from the federal government. Each payer's program varies in terms of the health services covered as well as the amount of the cost of care allocated back to the individual in the form of visit copayments, individual deductibles, and other cost-sharing strategies. These offerings are administered by various health plans and many payers offer multiple administrative alternatives. For example, Medicare is administered nationally, but there are multiple "Medicare Advantage" alternatives available as well as the basic program offering. In addition, there are numerous Medicare supplemental plans available to increase the benefits for the individual recipient. Founded in 2014, DPC Concentric Health System's (DPC Concentric's) mission is to identify the people, strategies, and capital needed to help the U.S. health care system heal itself. Based on continuous improvement design driven by continuous learning, DPC Concentric's human capital/technology initiatives deploy the power of entrepreneurial physicians in a free market. This social entrepreneurial approach responds distinctly to the incumbent relationship infrastructure of "fee-for-service" third-party reimbursement at the provider and self-funded payer levels. The DPC Concentric continuous-improvement infrastructure becomes practical, achievable, and self-perpetuating as incumbent leadership commits to catalyzing outcome-based health care solutions. It is distinctly relationship based, providing incumbent advisers ample opportunity to lead as continuous-improvement consultants to physicians and employers.

Learning Objectives

The objectives of this case are to provide students with a comprehensive case in which they have the opportunity to identify and address the ways in such a mission-driven organization can spur social entrepreneurship. Specifically, students must address 1) The leadership role that the organization must assume in paving the way to become a standard of care and a model for how the incumbent relationship infrastructure of fee-for-service third-party reimbursement at the provider and self-funded payer levels could be disrupted with sustainable effect; 2) an understanding of the opportunities and challenges of creating an organization based on a highly disruptive technology; the importance and implications of social entrepreneurship in championing a technology within a particular (in this case medical) field forward; how, in healthcare, social capital principles may attract the status quo levers of power and use them to drive acceptance of and adherence to a continuously improving system of care; and understanding how to strike the balance between existing and new personal services and existing and new technologies to build resilience.

  • Overview

    The existing U.S. health care system is complex. Most individuals have health insurance coverage provided by various third-party payers. The payers include employers, health insurance carriers, and government-sponsored programs, such as nationally administered Medicare and Medicaid, which is offered by all 50 states with some support from the federal government. Each payer's program varies in terms of the health services covered as well as the amount of the cost of care allocated back to the individual in the form of visit copayments, individual deductibles, and other cost-sharing strategies. These offerings are administered by various health plans and many payers offer multiple administrative alternatives. For example, Medicare is administered nationally, but there are multiple "Medicare Advantage" alternatives available as well as the basic program offering. In addition, there are numerous Medicare supplemental plans available to increase the benefits for the individual recipient. Founded in 2014, DPC Concentric Health System's (DPC Concentric's) mission is to identify the people, strategies, and capital needed to help the U.S. health care system heal itself. Based on continuous improvement design driven by continuous learning, DPC Concentric's human capital/technology initiatives deploy the power of entrepreneurial physicians in a free market. This social entrepreneurial approach responds distinctly to the incumbent relationship infrastructure of "fee-for-service" third-party reimbursement at the provider and self-funded payer levels. The DPC Concentric continuous-improvement infrastructure becomes practical, achievable, and self-perpetuating as incumbent leadership commits to catalyzing outcome-based health care solutions. It is distinctly relationship based, providing incumbent advisers ample opportunity to lead as continuous-improvement consultants to physicians and employers.

  • Learning Objectives

    Learning Objectives

    The objectives of this case are to provide students with a comprehensive case in which they have the opportunity to identify and address the ways in such a mission-driven organization can spur social entrepreneurship. Specifically, students must address 1) The leadership role that the organization must assume in paving the way to become a standard of care and a model for how the incumbent relationship infrastructure of fee-for-service third-party reimbursement at the provider and self-funded payer levels could be disrupted with sustainable effect; 2) an understanding of the opportunities and challenges of creating an organization based on a highly disruptive technology; the importance and implications of social entrepreneurship in championing a technology within a particular (in this case medical) field forward; how, in healthcare, social capital principles may attract the status quo levers of power and use them to drive acceptance of and adherence to a continuously improving system of care; and understanding how to strike the balance between existing and new personal services and existing and new technologies to build resilience.