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James Madison and "The Business of May Next" (A)
Cross, Tom; Newell, Terry; Rice, Peter Case OB-0968 / Published February 3, 2009 / 10 pages.
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Product Overview

On April 8, 1787, James Madison wrote to Governor Edmund Randolph of Virginia: "My Dear Friend, I am glad to find that you are turning your thoughts towards the business of May next." Madison was referring to the Federal Convention scheduled to begin the next month in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation. Madison's project was for an entirely new form of government?although the upcoming gathering had made clear its aim of merely improving the existing government under the Articles of Confederation. This case explores the extraordinary leadership of James Madison who had few stereotypical qualities of a leader.


Learning Objectives

Leadership is about what leaders do, not sterotypical qualities. Extraordinary preparation and perseverance can overcome oratory deficits.

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  • Overview

    On April 8, 1787, James Madison wrote to Governor Edmund Randolph of Virginia: "My Dear Friend, I am glad to find that you are turning your thoughts towards the business of May next." Madison was referring to the Federal Convention scheduled to begin the next month in Philadelphia to revise the Articles of Confederation. Madison's project was for an entirely new form of government?although the upcoming gathering had made clear its aim of merely improving the existing government under the Articles of Confederation. This case explores the extraordinary leadership of James Madison who had few stereotypical qualities of a leader.

  • Learning Objectives

    Learning Objectives

    Leadership is about what leaders do, not sterotypical qualities. Extraordinary preparation and perseverance can overcome oratory deficits.